Learning in Mexico versus the U.S.

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Learning in Mexico versus the U.S.

Segundaria Sor Juana Ines de La Cruz en La joya, Durango, Mexico.

Segundaria Sor Juana Ines de La Cruz en La joya, Durango, Mexico.

Segundaria Sor Juana Ines de La Cruz en La joya, Durango, Mexico.

Segundaria Sor Juana Ines de La Cruz en La joya, Durango, Mexico.

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It’s more difficult for students in Mexico to finish their education than it is in the U.S. 

Mexico and the United States have a distinct culture. Their way of living is very different to the United States, as well as their views on education. Many students in Mexico live in poverty and are forced to start working at a young age. Education is not viewed as something essential; youth grow up with the notion that it is more important to work and provide for their family. But those who do go through with their education have a much more different educational experience than one in the United States. In a random survey of 93 Morton East students, 71% students reported that it is easier to finish school in the United States than it is in Mexico.  

“En los salones ay menos estudiantes asi que los maestros estan mas alpendientes de ellos. Muchos de los estudiantes vienen de pueblos alrededor y  llegan como pueden,” Alumno de la escuela Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Jose Emanuel Venegas Lopez dijo.   

The number of students in each classroom is much smaller than it is in the united states. In each school there are about 200 students who attend; the reduced class size is an advantage to students and teachers as it improves learning. Even though class size is an advantage, many students struggle with finding transportation to school.  

“Yo regularmente llego a la escuela en Taxi, esta mas o menos como unos 20 kilometros de mi casa,” Alumno de la escuela Cbtis 109, Luis Varela Chavez dijo.  

Schools in Mexico don’t provide transportation for their students. Students often must travel miles, sometimes even walking to be able to get to school. Many find this as too much of a challenge and choose to not continue with their education.  

“Hay muchos que nada mas terminan la escuela secundaria y se van a trabajar. Los que pueden y quieren seguin y van a la preparatoria,” Alumno de la escuela Everardo Gamez Olivas, Pablo Hiram Gonzalez Reza dijo. 

Student Luis Varela Chavez agrees that most students don’t further continue their education on to a University because of lack of transportation and income.  

“Muchos nada mas terminan la prepa y no siguen por la economia y falta de transporte.” 

On the other hand, it seems like most of the students who attend private schools manage to continue and finish off their education.  

“School is better in Mexico.  I went to Colegio Valladolid, and I usually got to school because my parents would drive me. They offered me an English class, math, and physics. I went to a private school and most students did complete their education,” Said former Student Sara Roque at North-Grand High School.  

Although students in Mexico that attend private schools don’t have trouble getting there or finishing off their studies, most of the schools in Mexico cannot provide their students with the updated technology as a resource to assist in completing school work.  

“Lo único malo es que no contamos con laboratorios ni buenos centros de computación y tecnología,” alumno de la preparatoria de El Plateado Zac, Juan Francisco Marquez dijo.

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