Who still trick-or-treats?

Children+and+their+mother%27s+on+a+Halloween+night%2C+trick-or-treating.+
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Who still trick-or-treats?

Children and their mother's on a Halloween night, trick-or-treating.

Children and their mother's on a Halloween night, trick-or-treating.

Courtesy of Vancouver Courier

Children and their mother's on a Halloween night, trick-or-treating.

Courtesy of Vancouver Courier

Courtesy of Vancouver Courier

Children and their mother's on a Halloween night, trick-or-treating.

Miriam Jimenez, Reporter

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Recently, many cities across the country have been adapting an age limit for the people who can go trick-or-treating on Halloween night. 

Courtesy of Vancouver Courier
Children and their mother are on a Halloween night, trick-or-treating.

Interestingly, Halloween is the second highest grossing commercial holiday after Christmas, but due to the new adaptations, this may all change. According to ABC Action News, in Chesapeake, Virginia, anyone who is over the age of 13 and is caught trick-or-treating, can be sent to jail for up to 6 months and will receive a misdemeanor on their record. The mayor Mark Eckert of Belleville, Ill., states that he heard from single mothers and senior citizens complaining they were frightened by “6-foot-tall kids” showing up at their homes in search of candy. In a random survey of 100 Morton East students, 67 of them confirmed they were going to go trick-or-treating this Halloween night. 

“I would rather have teens trick-or-treat on Halloween night than have them out doing bad things they shouldn’t suppose to be doing. Asking for candies is harmless,” senior Juliana Rodríguez said.  

Regardless of teens asking for candies around a neighborhood with creepy costumes and masks, some teens still feel safe on Halloween night.  

“During Halloween night I do feel safe. There are parents out with their kids, and in case anything happens, they will be there,” junior Karla Lezama said.  

Many students claim that teens should have the freedom of dressing up and ask for candies during Halloween, but others are concerned about the children.  

“Halloween should be a time for children to dress up, have fun and ask for candies. But now, most teens who are dressing up as something spine-chilling, are scaring the children and ruining their fun,” a local Morton student said.  

 

 

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